Capital markets, Managerial Economics

CAPITAL MARKETS

Markets in which financial resources (money, bonds, stocks) are traded i.e. the provision of longer term finance - anything from bank loans to investment in permanent capital in the form of the purchase of shares.  The capital market is very widespread.

It can also be defined as the institution through which, together with financial intermediaries, savings in the economy are transferred to investor.

Posted Date: 11/29/2012 4:59:43 AM | Location : United States







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