Calculate the entropy change - ideal gas, Physics

1. Calculate the entropy change when 1 kmol of an ideal gas at 300 K and 10 bar expands to a pressure of 1 bar if the temperature stays constant.

2. What is the change in entropy when 1 kmol of an ideal gas at 335 K and 10 bar is expanded irreversibly to 300 K and 1 bar? Cp = 29.3 KJ/(kmol K)

 

Posted Date: 3/14/2013 1:48:43 AM | Location : United States







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