Bovine spongiform encephalopathy, Biology

Bovine spongiform encephalopathy

The bovine transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), known as 'mad cow disease'-first noticed in Great Britain in 1986, is similar to scrapie in sheep and Creustfeld Jacob syndrome (CJD) in man, chronic wasting disease of captive mule deer and rocky mountain elk and transmissible encephalopathies in mink. It has been reported from Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, Oman, Switzerland, France, Germany and a few other European countries. There is no report of BSE in India so far although doubtful cases of CJD in human beings have been reported. The causative agent is structurally different from a virus in that it contains protein (PrP) which is a transformed naturally occurring protein constituent of neurons that is encoded by a single chromosomal gene and devoid of nucleic acid. This agent measures 30-50 nm and is extremely resistant to inactivation by heating, UV-irradiation and many chemicals. BSE is classified as Prion disease.


Epidemiology: The disease in cattle occurred as a result of feeding them with ruminant protein supplements in meat and bone-meal derived from scrapie-affected sheep.


Symptoms:
It is difficult to diagnose the disease on the basis of clinical signs since such signs are not quite spectacular. Histopathological and histochemical studies, electron microscopy and biochemical analysis for detection of prion protein are presently available for laboratory confirmation of the disease.Prevention, control and treatment: Identification and slaughtering of positive and suspected cases are the only means of control measures available at present

Posted Date: 9/18/2012 6:53:01 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Bovine spongiform encephalopathy, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Bovine spongiform encephalopathy, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Bovine spongiform encephalopathy Discussions

Write discussion on Bovine spongiform encephalopathy
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
Explain the Fluoride Toxicity? Fluoride is a cumulative toxin. Ingestion of fluoride 1.0-1.5 mg/L for several years may produce dental fluorosis, i.e. browning and pitting of t

Q. How is the mesoderm (third germ layer) of triploblastic animals formed? The mesoderm shows from differentiation of endodermal cells that cover the dorsal region of the arche

Explain in detail about the Concomitant squint Concomitant squint is also called comitant squint. It means "I follow you", i.e., in all directions of gazes, the squinted eye fo

Determine the purpose of  the study: There must be  a sound  rationale  or justification for every research project.  If  the pui-pose of  the  study is clearly presented and just

What is the autotrophic hypothesis on the origin of life? The autotrophic hypothesis on the origin of life asserts that the first living beings on earth were producers of thei

What is  Posterior Aneurysm? The technique of Posterior Aneurysm operation is the same. Care must be taken to avoid injury to the posterior papillary muscle and poster

what is usually regarded as evidence that photosynthesis has occurred in a plant?

Describe cytokinesis in a plant cell. Vesicles produced by the Golgi apparatus fuse at  the midline of the cell to form the cell plate, a  cell wall that elongates to divide th

What is the type of genetic inheritance that determines the ABO blood group system? What are the relations of dominance among the involved alleles? The inheritance of the ABO b

Define the Sleep disorder - Effect of Obesity? One of the common problems that obese males and females suffer from is sleep disorder, commonly known as sleep apnoea. Obesity ca