Bid, Game Theory

 

. A bid is an sign by a potential buyer of the price the buyer is ready to pay for the object being auctioned. In a Procurement Auction, the bid is an sign of the price a seller is ready to receive to offer the auctioned services oir gooods. Often, a new bid must recover substantially the earlier bid, as defined by the auctioneer's bidding increment.

 

Posted Date: 7/21/2012 5:27:32 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Bid, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Bid, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Bid Discussions

Write discussion on Bid
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
Matches or different objects are organized in 2 or a lot of piles. Players alternate removing some or all of the matches from anyone pile. The player to get rid of the last match w

GAME PLAYING IN CLASS There are several games that are appropriate for use on the first or second day of class. These games are simple but can be used to convey important poin

Identification is closely related to the estimation of the model. If an equation is identified, its coefficient can, in general, be statistically estimated. In particula

A collection of colluding bidders. Ring members comply with rig bids by agreeing to not bid against one another, either by avoiding the auction or by putting phony (phantom) bids

Extraneous Estimates If some parameters are identified, while others are not and there exists information on their value from other (extraneous) sources, the researcher may pro

A game tree (also referred to as the in depth form) may be a graphical illustration of a sequential game. It provides data concerning the players, payoffs, strategies, and also the

A subset or piece of a sequential game starting at some node such {that each that each} player is aware of each action of the players that moved before him at every purpose. Sub ga

write a program in c that takes n number finite players using gambit format and output is to be all pure strategy nash equilibrium

Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

Consider the Cournot duopoly model in which two firms, 1 and 2, simultaneously choose the quantities they will sell in the market, q1 and q2. The price each receives for each unity