Bases of share valuation, Finance Basics

Bases of Share Valuation

Share valuation can be done on the basis of income and asset values. On the basis of income still a share will be entitled to two forms of income. For this purpose the bases of valuing shares are as:

i) Earnings method

ii) Dividend method

iii) Assets method

Posted Date: 1/31/2013 1:55:24 AM | Location : United States







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