Antimatter in observable universe, Physics

Why is there far more matter than antimatter in the observable universe?

Ans) It may have to do with the way the universe was created. Certainly if there was a lot of antimatter created, much of it may well have come in contact with matter through the billions of years the universe has existed. That would have resulted in the conversion of that antimatter (along with a like amount of matter) into energy. There may not have been much antimatter around to begin with, too. But, since the amount of visible matter represents less matter than has been calculated to exist in the uinverse, it may be that there is a good bit of antimatter out there somewhere. Not likely, but possible.

Posted Date: 3/11/2013 3:19:47 AM | Location : United States







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