Angle count method, Applied Statistics

Angle Count method

The method for estimating the proportion of the area of a forest which is in fact covered by the bases of trees. An observer goes to each of the number of points in the forest, chosen randomly or systematically, and counts the number of trees which subtend, at that particular point, an angle greater than or equal to the predetermined and fixed angle 2α.

 

 

Posted Date: 7/25/2012 5:21:46 AM | Location : United States







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