Acute rheumatic fever, Biology

Acute Rheumatic Fever 

Rheumatic  fever is an inflammatory disease that usually follows infection of upper respiratory tract with group A beta hemolytic streptococci. It  is characterised by lesions in the heart, blood vessels, joints and other connective tissues. The body becomes sensitized  to the organism after repeated attacks (and develops an allergic or  automimune response to it). 

Etiology 

The exact cause  is usually not known. It is considered to be a hypersensitivity reaction to beta-hemolytic streptococci (Group A). The Predisposing factors are:  Nursing Care of  children with Cardiovascular and

i)  Age: The incidence peaks between 5  and 15 years of  age and is rare below 3 years.

ii)  Socio-economic status : Common among poor socio-economic; over crowded families with poor dietary background having substandard health practices and low education level. 

iii)  Climate: Temperature, subtropical and  tropical areas,

iv)  Season: High incidence in winter months. 

v)  Genetic predisposition: The disease tends to  run  in families. 

vi)  Previous attack: An attack of  upper respiratory infection carries 5 per cent risk of  rheumcltic fever. Previous history of  rheumatic fever carries 5 per cent risk of recurrence. 

vii)  Sex: Equal in both sexes.  

Posted Date: 10/26/2012 9:01:58 AM | Location : United States







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