Absolute auction, Game Theory

 

A general term for an English auction in which there is no reserve price, guaranteeing that the object will be sold to the highest bidder regardless of the quantity of the bid.

 

Posted Date: 7/21/2012 5:21:47 AM | Location : United States







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