integral 0 to pi e^cosx cos (sinx) dx, Mathematics

Let u = sin(x). Then du = cos(x) dx. So you can now antidifferentiate e^u du.

This is e^u + C = e^sin(x) + C.

 Then substitute your range 0 to pi.

e^sin (pi)-e^sin(0)



Posted Date: 3/11/2013 1:52:09 AM | Location : United States

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