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Elucidate the two factors that can cause the nation real gdp
Course:- Business Economics
Reference No.:- EM1349668





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Assume that the Keynesian short-run aggregate supply curve is applicable to a nation's economy. Using the Grapher, create appropriate diagrams to assist in answering the following questions:

a. What are two factors that can cause the nation's real GDP to increase in the short run?

b. Elucidate the two factors that can cause the nation's real GDP to increase in the long run?




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