Central emotional experience of kierkegaards philosophy

Assignment Help Other Subject
Reference no: EM13522085

1. The central emotional experience of Kierkegaard's philosophy and life was:

A. his early physical self-indulgence.

B. the death of his father at an early age.

C. his confrontation with existential dread.

D. his devotion to Hegelian philosophy.

E. his fascination with the philosophy of Plato.

2. "Existential dread" is the:

A. fear of dying young.

B. fear of eternal damnation.

C. fear that one's life is meaningless.

D. fear of dying before one's life's work has been completed.

E. None of the above

3. For Kierkegaard and his Pietist associates, to believe in God is to:

A. believe in the power of prayer.

B. attend the proper rituals and recite the appropriate prayers.

C. expect certain punishment for worldly sin.

D. trust God to provide an eternal life after death.

E. None of the above

4. For Kierkegaard, the central religious problem was the:

A. problem of evil.

B. problem of faith.

C. search for a proof of God's existence.

D. problem of determining the nature of the afterlife.

E. None of the above

5. The price of salvation, according to Kierkegaard's variety of Protestantism, is:

A. the performance of "good works."

B. frequent public attestations of belief in God's existence.

C. unconditioned faith in God's promise of eternal life.

D. Both A and C

E. None of the above

2

6. In order to be saved, according to Kierkegaard, one's faith must be:

A. free from all doubt, including doubt that one is deserving of eternal life.

B. held throughout an observant life.

C. justified by reason.

D. given only after a long period of questioning one's worthiness.

E. All of the above

7. The offer of eternal life in exchange for sincere faith caused fear and torment because:

A. each person has committed some sin.

B. different people interpreted it different ways.

C. doubts lurking deep within a believer's heart make it nearly impossible to be sure that one has unconditional faith in God.

D. we are limited by our imperfect understanding of the motives of God.

E. None of the above

8. According to Robert Paul Wolff in his text, About Philosophy, Kierkegaard did battle with three "enemies" in his life against whom he turned his prodigious intellectual and literary abilities and his convoluted, ironic wit; these were:

A. atheism, parental authority, and religion.

B. non-European peoples, non-Protestant religions, and the "aesthetes."

C. established Christianity (19th-century Lutheranism), complacent bourgeois culture, and Hegelian philosophy.

D. agnostics, the ruling class, and Socratic philosophy.

E. Pentecostal Christians, labor unions, and the literary press.

9. Kierkegaard opposed himself to:

A. the Lutheran Church.

B. Hegelian philosophers.

C. middle-class society.

D. Both A and B

E. All of the above

10. Existentialism is the philosophical doctrine according to which our being as subjective individuals is more important than:

A. what we have in common objectively with other human beings.

B. our objective relationship with God.

C. our ability to exercise individual choices.

D. our choice of inner beliefs.

E. None of the above

3

11. Marx and Kierkegaard:

A. disagreed concerning the value of Hegelian philosophy.

B. were both concerned with the issue of poverty.

C. both concerned themselves with religious reform.

D. were opposed to the same forces, though they attacked them in very different ways.

E. All of the above

12. Truth, according to Kierkegaard, is achieved by:

A. using rational means to prove a belief.

B. using empirical methods to verify a belief.

C. showing that the contrary of a belief entails a contradiction.

D. possessing a belief that you hold passionately and without doubt.

E. None of the above

13. Who among the following denies that we can prove that God exists?

A. William Paley

B. Anselm

C. Thomas Aquinas

D. G.W. Leibniz

E. Søren Kierkegaard

14. When Kierkegaard said we must make a "leap of faith," he meant we:

A. should believe in God because the evidence supports our doing so.

B. should believe in God specifically because the evidence suggests we should not.

C. cannot construct a decisive argument for or against a belief in God, so we must believe in God without any appeal to reason whatsoever.

D. cannot construct a decisive argument for or against a belief in God, so we must suspend our judgment.

E. None of the above

15. Which argument does Kierkegaard use for the existence of God?

A. The Argument from Design

B. The Argument from First Cause

C. The Ontological Argument

D. A version of the Cosmological Argument

E. Kierkegaard gives no argument for the existence of God.

4

16. The objective truth of a statement depends upon:

A. whether or not it conforms to some independent state of affairs in the world.

B. what the scientific authorities think about it.

C. whether or not the subject passionately believes it.

D. the relation between a belief and the subject of the belief.

E. the relation between the belief and itself.

17. According to Kierkegaard, truth depends on:

A. the relation between a statement and independent objects in the world.

B. whether a statement's contrary entails a contradiction.

C. the relation between a belief and its subject.

D. the preponderance of the evidence being for or against a statement.

E. Both B and C

18.

19. Kierkegaard claims that a rational proof of God's existence is impossible because:

A. God would not want such a proof to be possible.

B. God is infinite, and the mind of man is finite.

C. if we could prove God's existence, we would have done so by now.

D. it would remove God's essential mystery.

E. None of the above

19. The essential feature(s) of Kierkegaard's philosophy, according to the author, is:

A. his opposition to the religious views of the burghers.

B. the "leap of faith."

C. the subjectivity of truth.

D. Both B and C

E. Both A and B

20. Kierkegaard says it is a mistake fo r me to ask about another person's mind, because I risk the possibility of:

A. violating the other person's solitude.

B. being deceived.

C. entanglement.

D. sin.

E. All of the above

5

21. Kierkegaard tells us that the only ethical interest is interest:

A. in the well-being of those less fortunate.

B. in the sincerity of others.

C. on one's own subjective reality.

D. in objective reality.

E. in one's relation to one's community.

22. Kierkegaard says that Christianity is not a doctrine, but

A. the fact that God has existed as an actual human being.

B. the doctrine of the unity of the divine and the human.

C. the claim that subject and object are, in fact, identical.

D. a collection of rituals and observances.

E. None of the above

23. The object of faith, according to Kierkegaard, is the:

A. doctrine of Christianity.

B. self.

C. to bring others to the belief in God.

D. reality of the teacher.

E. objectivity of truth.

24. The soundness of Paley's Argument from Design relies upon:

A. the existence of a blind watchmaker.

B. an argument from analogy.

C. mathematical ratios.

D. a leap of faith.

E. an ethical principle.

25. The fact that the world seems to have a purposive order serves as a premise in the:

A. Ontological Argument.

B. Cosmological Argument.

C. Argument from Design.

D. Argument from First Cause.

E. Argument from Analogy.

6

26. Paley argues that a watch is to a watchmaker as:

A. a hydraulic machine is to God.

B. a prince is to a king.

C. the eye is to an intelligent creator.

D. a museum is to a curator.

E. None of the above

27. "We know, by the evidence of our senses, that in the world some things are moved," is a premise of:

A. the Ontological Argument.

B. the Cosmological Argument.

C. the Argument from Design.

D. an argument offered by St. Anselm.

E. the Argument from Analogy.

28. "Hence, that, than which nothing greater can be conceived, exists, and it is this that we call God," is the conclusion of:

A. the Ontological Argument.

B. the Cosmological Argument.

C. the Argument from Design.

D. an argument given by William Paley.

E. an argument offered by Kierkegaard.

29. "To exist in actuality is greater than merely to be possible," is a premise of:

A. the Ontological Argument.

B. the Cosmological Argument.

C. the Argument from Design.

D. St. Thomas's best-known argument.

E. the Argument from Analogy.

30. The claim that everything that moves must have been started in motion by some other thing is part of:

A. the Ontological Argument.

B. the Cosmological Argument.

C. the Argument from Design.

D. Anselm's most famous argument.

E. the Argument from Analogy.

7

31. Sometimes, striking a random series of keys on a piano will produce a pleasant tune, even though no one composed it. This sort of example could be used to challenge the:

A. Ontological Argument.

B. Cosmological Argument.

C. Argument from Design.

D. Argument from First Cause.

E. None of the above

32. One important flaw in the Argument from Design is:

A. philosophers hold all arguments from analogy to be invalid.

B. it requires a "leap of faith."

C. even if its reasoning were correct, it wouldn't prove the existence of an omnipotent God.

D. many parts of the universe show no sign of purposive organization.

E. Both A and D

33. If all the premises of the Argument from Design were true, it would demonstrate that

A. an omnipotent, benevolent, omniscient creature exists.

B. the God of the Bible exists.

C. a long-lived, wise, powerful organizer of the universe exists.

D. God exists, but lacks some of His traditional attributes.

E. None of the above

34. Hume's discussion of the Argument from Design employs the example of the house and the architect to show:

A. that Paley had the right approach, but should have used a house as his example instead of an eye.

B. that God is not related to the universe the same way that a house is related to an architect.

C. that the universe doesn't really seem to display a purposive order.

D. Both A and B

E. None of the above

35. St. Thomas thought that the best way to gain knowledge of God was:

A. by the use of reason.

B. by a "leap of faith."

C. by revelation.

D. through the study of Scripture.

E. St. Thomas thought we were incapable of gaining knowledge of God.

8

36. One version of the Cosmological Argument attempts to derive God's existence from the fact that

A. the world is a well-organized place.

B. God can only be known subjectively.

C. an infinite idea must have an infinite source.

D. objects sometimes move.

E. None of the above

37. Aquinas’ Cosmological Argument assumes that:

A. there must be an infinite regress of causes.

B. an infinite regress is impossible.

C. nothing can be actually hot and potentially cold.

D. Both B and C

E. None of the above

38. Which of the following is an example of an infinite regress?

A. If I start with a chocolate bar, and give away half of my chocolate each day, I'll never run out of chocolate.

B. If I start a ball rolling, and no outside force acts on it, it will continue rolling forever.

C. There is no greatest prime number.

D. If my cat had to have other cats as parents, and they in turn had to have cats as their parents, and so on, there could be no first cat in the chain.

E. All of the above

39. Aquinas claims that no thing can be the cause of its own existence because:

A. only God can bring things into existence.

B. nothing can be simultaneously potential and actual.

C. it couldn't cause itself to exist if it didn't already exist.

D. there has to be a first cause.

E. None of the above

40. A necessary object, in Aquinas’ sense, is an object that:

A. creates other things.

B. is needed to start a chain of causes and effects.

C. exists.

D. can't fail to exist.

E. None of the above

9

41. Aquinas argues that, if there weren't at least one necessary object, then:

A. we couldn't gain knowledge of God through reason.

B. there would be an infinite regress of causes.

C. nothing would exist.

D. the universe would not display a purposive order.

E. God would not be omnipotent.

42. Hume, in his Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, gives objections to the:

A. Argument from Design.

B. Cosmological Argument.

C. Ontological Argument.

D. Both A and C

E. All of the above

43. According to Hume, no claim can be proven to be true unless:

A. the denial of the claim entails a contradiction.

B. we can conceive it clearly in our minds.

C. it's a clear and distinct proposition.

D. there is evidence eliminating all other possibilities.

E. it appears in Scripture.

44. Hume sees no difficulty in the possibility of "an eternal succession of objects," without beginning or end. This is meant to be an objection to:

A. the Argument from Design.

B. the Cosmological Argument.

C. the Ontological Argument.

D. Kierkegaard's "leap of faith."

E. Both B and C

45. When the painter has finished his work, and is admiring it, Anselm would say that the:

A. painting exists in reality.

B. painting exists in the understanding.

C. painting can no longer be conceived.

D. Both A and B

E. Both A and C

10

46. An interesting property of Anselm's Ontological Argument is that it:

A. shows there can be an infinite regress of causes.

B. makes no mention of God.

C. incorporates the view that truth is subjective.

D. relies upon faith, rather than reason.

E. attempts to derive God's existence from the mere concept of God.

47. Which of the following is an a priori proposition?

A. The Norman Conquest occurred in 1066.

B. Too much salt can raise your blood pressure.

C. Most mammals have four legs.

D. All the angles in a square are 90 degrees.

E. None of the above

48. According to Kant, any proposition that asserts the existence of something must be:

A. unprovable.

B. a tautology.

C. analytic.

D. synthetic.

E. self-contradictory.

49. Which of the following statements is analytic?

A. There is evil in the world.

B. The Confederacy lost the Civil War.

C. A round room has no corners.

D. Old men go bald.

E. None of the above

50. Which of the following statements is synthetic?

A. Every triangle has three sides.

B. 6+7=13

C. Every city has a street called "Main."

D. No bachelor is married.

E. None of the above

51. The key to Kant's criticism of the Ontological Argument is:

A. Anselm should have gathered empirical evidence to support his claim.

B. the claim that "God exists" is synthetic, not analytic.

C. it assumes an infinite regress of causes.

11

D. there's no difference between existence in the understanding and existence in reality.

E. there can't be an uncaused First Cause.

52. If God is willing to prevent evil, but unable to do so, then he is not:

A. benevolent.

B. omniscient.

C. omnipotent.

D. benevolent or omniscient.

E. benevolent, omniscient, or omnipotent.

53. According to Leibniz's "Best of All Possible Worlds" response to the problem of evil:

A. God is not benevolent.

B. there is no evil in the world.

C. God permits some human suffering in the world, although it's the least amount logically possible.

D. God is not omniscient.

E. None of the above

54. The aim of the several varieties of the argument from evil is

A. to prove that God's wisdom transcends human understanding.

B. to prove that belief in God is irrational.

C. to prove that God does not exist.

D. Both B and C.

E. None of the above.

55. In discussing Kierkegaard's notion that "Truth is Subjectivity," Wolff contrasts this idea with the contention that the objective truth of a statement depends on

A. whether or not it conforms to some independent state of affairs in the world.

B. what the scientific authorities think about it.

C. whether or not the subject passionately believes it.

D. the relations between the belief and the believer.

E. the relation between the belief and the belief itself (as a statement of belief).

56. Forty-four percent of Americans are confident that Jesus will return to Earth sometime in the next 50 years. According to Sam Harris, this is a problem because it leaves them with:

A. no incentive to build a sustainable civilization.

B. no hope for the future

C. a great fear of science and new technology

D. motive to disrespect other religions

E. too little time to lead a fulfilling life on earth

12

57. Sam Harris defines faith as:

A. the ultimate solution to all the world’s problems.

B. the license to keep believing when reasons fail.

C. a supernatural kind of knowledge that is more certain than reason.

D. the right and privilege of any free-thinking individual.

E. the handmaiden of reason, without which reason would be sterile.

58. Which of the following is NOT one of the commonalities between Buddhism and modern science, according to Tenzin Gyatso, the Dalai Lama?

A. Deep suspicion of any notion of absolutes,

B. Preference for the theory of evolution

C. Empirical methodology

D. Rejection of traditional religious cosmology

E. Respect for and protection of all forms of life

Reference no: EM13522085

Distribution strategy-initial pricing strategy

What will be your initial pricing strategy and what will be your ultimate pricing strategy? How will you focus it on your target market? Next, what will be your distribution s

Cultural immersion activity for myself

I need to do a cultural immersion activity for myself then write about it. The experience should expose me to a culture I may encounter in my current or future classroom and s

Accounting capstone

Explain the meaning of each ratio and do companies want the ratio to be a higher or a lower figure and which stakeholder(s) will be more interested in the ratios? Why?

What are human rights

What are human rights? Discuss Benthams point of view on human rights and the coherence critique of human rights? Do you find them convincing? In On the Jewish Question, Mar

Theory of power argues-representation in their government

A political system that denies people participation or representation in their government is called. Systems and structures that persist over time and help to organize group l

Do find it appropriate for supreme court to interpret us

The Supreme Court Justices are appointed by the president and approved by the Senate. Now that we understand how the justices are elected, and the perks and downfalls to the

Specific elements of picasso guernica

Describe specific elements of Picasso's Guernica and explain how effective you think the painting is as a protest against the horrors of war.

Developing a proposal preparation plan

Analyze each of the key proposal preparation documents discussed in Osbornes Developing a Proposal Preparation Plan and recommend at least one additional document that would

Reviews

Write a Review

 
Free Assignment Quote

Assured A++ Grade

Get guaranteed satisfaction & time on delivery in every assignment order you paid with us! We ensure premium quality solution document along with free turntin report!

All rights reserved! Copyrights ©2019-2020 ExpertsMind IT Educational Pvt Ltd